Wednesday, 10 June 2015

A Timelapse of Illustrator Patrick Vale Drawing a Huge Pen & Ink View of the New York Skyline

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In December of last year London-based artist Patrick Vale spent several weeks drawing this impressive pen and ink illustration of the New York skyline as viewed from the Rockefeller Center. Luckily he photographed almost every moment of the endeavor to make this timelapse where we see building after building materialize at the tip of his pen. The final piece titled Colossus is a triptych of three huge A1 sheets of paper that he scanned and turned into an even larger wallpaper. You might remember Vale from his 2012 drawing timelapse of Lower Manhattan.(via Highsnobiety)

 
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Cassini Sends Final Close Views of Odd Moon Hyperion

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has returned images from its final close approach to Saturn’s oddball moon Hyperion, upholding the

The post Cassini Sends Final Close Views of Odd Moon Hyperion has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Graphene promise for body armour

The "wonder material" graphene could be used to make bulletproof armour, new research suggests. 
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Jim Darling’s Airplane Window Seat Paintings Frame Landscapes From Mile-High Perspectives

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Often I use the windows of airplanes as frames in which to view the landscapes just beyond the thick glass— scenes featuring rolling clouds, rich gradient skies, and patchwork fields. Jim Darling has taken this idea of the window as frame and created paintings that place the audience as passenger, showcasing vague yet nostalgic landscapes within his constructed airplane windows.

Darling’s paintings are from this sky-high perspective, painted cities, clouds, and oceans with the occasional wing creeping into the painting from the far edges. Each work includes layered woodwork, acrylic, and aerosol to build the tromp l’oeil nature of the piece, allowing one to finally experience these atmospheric views without the turbulence. (via Stop, Drop & Vogue)

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Unraveling the origins of lunar swirls

As the closest object in the night sky, Earth’s moon and its craters have long been studied. These

The post Unraveling the origins of lunar swirls has been published on Technology Org.

 
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