Sunday, 14 June 2015

The Visually Stunning ‘Tesseract’ Scene in Interstellar was Filmed on a Physically Constructed Set

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Spoiler alert. One of the most jaw-dropping moments of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar is the climactic moment when Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) enters a visually stunning environment that allows him to physically communicate through time using gravity. In the movie, the scene is manifested as a small library in his home that appears to infinitely repeat with versions of every moment that has ever occurred there. Essentially it’s a cube in four dimensions. Here’s a pretty good explanation of how it works:

The Tesseract is a means of communication for the bulk beings to express action through gravity with NASA. The bulk beings can perceive five dimensions as opposed to four, able to see every moment in the past, present, and future as well as influence gravity within any of those time frames. […] The tesseract allowed Cooper to communicate with Murphy Cooper [his daughter] in various time periods, presenting time itself as a dimension rather than linear. Everything is linked by the strings of time, which Cooper can manipulate. The beings made this comprehensible to Cooper by allowing him to physically interact with the Tesseract.

The idea of the tesseract scene alone was so daunting to the filmmakers, Nolan and his special effects team procrastinated for months before trying to tackle how it might work. After months of concepting and model building the team opted for the unusual approach of using minimal digital effects in favor of fabricating a massive set which the actors could physically manipulate. A remarkable feat considering not only the complexity of the concepts depicted, but the cost and labor of building something so large.

Included here are some shots of the set, a behind-the-scenes interview with Nolan and a number of people from the visual effects team explaining how it was done, and lastly the scene itself. You can watch even more of it here. (via Fubiz)

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Catch Jupiter Homing in on Venus Through June

Are you ready to hear an upswing in queries from friends/family and/or strangers on Twitter asking “what are

The post Catch Jupiter Homing in on Venus Through June has been published on Technology Org.

 
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VIDEO: Hawking on internet and humans' fate

Professor Stephen Hawking talks to the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones about the power modern technology has to transform our lives. 
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‘Chunky Knits’ by Anna Mo Incorporate Enormous Stitches to Comfortably Engulf the Body

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Anna Mo‘s chunky knits are not shy about their pattern, the soft form of her objects forcing the wearer to observe the pieces in all of their magnified glory. To knit these mammoth material works the Ukraine-based Mo not only uses extremely thick sections of wool, but also XXL needles to produce her three-inch-thick stitches. In addition to her wearable works, Mo also sells the yarn that she uses to produce the pieces (100% Australian merino wool) as well as oversized knitting needles so you can produce your own chunky sweaters and blankets.

Mo learned to knit at an early age, continuing the hobby into adulthood as a side project in addition to her work as a designer. Mo uses the tactile nature of knitting to balance her hours in front of the computer, allowing her hands to get as much exercise as her brain. For more images of Mo’s snuggly knits visit her Instagram. (via Beautiful/Decay and ĪGNANT)

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Student helps fine-tune next generation of weather satellites

University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate student Thomas Polivka has publicly identified a flaw in new satellite remote sensing technology

The post Student helps fine-tune next generation of weather satellites has been published on Technology Org.

 
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