Monday, 6 July 2015

One from our Karmani Designer Lifestyle Disney Boutique. All sorts of custom gifts, party...

One from our Karmani Designer Lifestyle Disney Boutique. All sorts of custom gifts, party invitations and so much more. If you have a little one who adores Frozen, wants to be an Elsa or Prince Charming, then we have it in store for them. Come have a look at the wide range and see what they'll adore - espacially with their name on it!

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Controversial trial of GM crop shows no benefits

In 2012, protesters descended on an unlikely target: Rothamstead, the oldest agricultural research center in the world and a nonprofit that focuses on sustainable food production. The protesters weren't simply upset with some of the work going on there; they announced in advance that they planned to destroy it. The reason? It involved genetically modified crops.

Researchers at Rothamstead had introduced a gene from peppermint into wheat, allowing the crop to produce a chemical that aphids use as an alarm signal. In lab tests, aphids had avoided wheat carrying the additional gene, suggesting that the GM wheat could limit the need for pesticide applications. The lab findings, however, needed to be validated through field trials. And anti-GMO activists decided that these trials posed an unacceptable risk to the public and farmers and needed to be stopped.

With heightened security, the trials went forward, and the results have now been published. It turns out that the summer the trials were run was cold and rainy, and aphids as a whole didn't do well—there were so few even the control plants were "well below the recommended [pesticide] spray thresholds for summer aphids in the UK." The aphids that were present, however, didn't seem to mind the presence of the alarm pheromone on the transgenic wheat.

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Hello old friend - good to see you at last!

Hello old friend - good to see you at last!

NASA originally shared:

Only 8 days until our New Horizons spacecraft flies by Pluto, and the dwarft planet is beginning to come into focus. We have new images of Pluto from 7.8 million miles away. And one images shows the four mysterious dark spots on Pluto that have captured the imagination of the world. Details: http://go.nasa.gov/1M8oP3f #PlutoFlyby #NASABeyond

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Blogger Love: Everything is Everything

Desktop1

I usually try to come up with a theme for each edition of Links a la Mode, but this week’s topics were so varied that all I can think of is that Lauren Hill song. You guys covered everything from abandoned housing projects in Greece, to Gucci in New York, to graffiti in San Francisco (I guess G’s were actually a theme!). In any case, we’ve got lots of great writing, and images to go with it.
You know what else is everything? The midi-length denim skirt Ms. Hill is wearing in that video. I’d be stoked to score that at a vintage store. But I digress—on to the links! 
 -Kristen Philipowski

 
#trendingfashion 
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Theory Turns to Reality for Nonlinear Optical Metamaterials

A research team has realized one of the long-standing theoretical predictions in nonlinear optical metamaterials: creation of a

The post Theory Turns to Reality for Nonlinear Optical Metamaterials has been published on Technology Org.

 
#physics 
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New from NASA’s New Horizons: Increasing Variety on Pluto’s Close Approach Hemisphere, and a ‘Dark Pole’ on Charon

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft doesn’t pass Pluto until July 14 – but the mission team is making new

The post New from NASA’s New Horizons: Increasing Variety on Pluto’s Close Approach Hemisphere, and a ‘Dark Pole’ on Charon has been published on Technology Org.

 
#astronomy 
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Families with Papillon dogs will love this booth. It's devoted to the gorgeous breed and has...

Families with Papillon dogs will love this booth. It's devoted to the gorgeous breed and has doggy tshirts, mobile cases and lots more for the proud owner and dog

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Relativity’s time dilation may limit the quantum world

A new theoretical paper has tackled the phenomenon of quantum decoherence, the process by which objects slip out of the quantum world and start behaving classically. The paper approaches this in a new way by applying an effect of general relativity to decoherence. The paper claims that gravity is the key to the disparity between the weird quantum world and the everyday, familiar world of human-sized objects in which we live.

Decoherence is a concept central to quantum mechanics. Essentially, a quantum particle, unlike a macroscopic object, can exist in a superposition of different states. This means that in a real, physical way, it exists in all those different states at the same time (with varying probabilities; the stronger the probability of a state, the more strongly the particle inhabits that state).

These quantum states include things like the particle’s spin, charge, energy, and location. So in effect, when a particle is in a super-position, it can be in multiple places at once—like when photons or particles interfere with themselves. This marks the obvious difference with our macroscopic world, where we can never see an object inhabiting two places at the same time. (Or spinning in two directions at the same time for that matter and so on.)

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ANL chemist receives Eni Award for work with thermoelectrics

Chemist Mercouri Kanatzidis of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has received the Eni Award

The post ANL chemist receives Eni Award for work with thermoelectrics has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Triple Crescents

A single crescent moon is a familiar sight in Earth’s sky, but with Saturn’s many moons, you can

The post Triple Crescents has been published on Technology Org.

 
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