Saturday, 18 July 2015

I just found out that the opposite of extinct is extant. And now I see it is - a neural...

I just found out that the opposite of extinct is extant. And now I see it is - a neural connection made betwen two pieces of now-connected knowledge ;)

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About time I published this... how long before the word appears in Google?

About time I published this... how long before the word appears in Google?

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The nuclear age turns 70 today

Seventy years ago this morning, the world fully entered the nuclear age with the detonation of the first atomic bomb in Alamogordo, New Mexico. The bomb was the product of the Manhattan Project, a top-secret research program tasked with developing a bomb more powerful than any that had come before. The test, called Trinity, happened at 5:30am local time and yielded an explosion equivalent to 20,000 tons of TNT (20kT).

The Manhattan Project, and the earlier UK effort, Tube Alloys, stemmed from pre-World War II physics research that revealed the huge amounts of energy that could be liberated from the fission of uranium atom nuclei, assuming a self-sustaining chain reaction could be started. The bomb used in the Trinity test, called Gadget, used high explosives to compress plutonium into a critical mass. It was the same design used in the bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945; the bomb used on Hiroshima three days earlier was a cruder design.

The first 109 miliseconds of the Trinity test. If these images fill you with a morbid fascination, we highly recommend the book 100 Suns.

Robert Oppenheimer, a physicist chosen to lead the bomb's development, greeted the appearance of a second sun over the desert of New Mexico with a quote from a Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita: "Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds."

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Cybele Young’s Paper Sculptures Depict Everyday Objects Metamorphosing into Otherworldly Creatures

paper-1-extra
I Thought They Worked Better. Paper. 33 x 28 x 2.5 in.

paper-1-extra-detail
I Thought They Worked Better. Detail.

A pair of yellow headphones. A violin case. A set of keys. All miniature objects faithfully crafted from Japanese papers by Toronto-based artist Cybele Young, any one of which would be considered striking in its own right, but she doesn’t stop there. Each object, however mundane, is displayed step-by-step in a dramatic process of metamorphosis as it transforms into unusual organic lifeforms. A pair of rollerskates gradually becomes a network of fungus-like membranes, or an ordinary handbag grows an unnerving coat of sharp spikes. From her artist statement:

Engaging with abstract and familiar motifs, I juxtapose sculptures to create a sense of dialogue or play between them. I approach my work in series and components, ultimately building an ongoing inventory of personal experience and observation.

I compile these in various arrangements to create communities that interact and form new relationships – much like the small seemingly insignificant moments in our everyday lives that come together to create unexpected outcomes. These manifest as miniature theatres – one act plays, where shifts of scale and perception occur. Despite the absence of the human form there is an implied presence, where the viewer can project themselves into another world.

Young’s work is currently on view for two more days at Forum Gallery in New York, so don’t miss it. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx David!)

jelly

paper-1
You Know That Place. Paper. 30 x 40 x 4 in.

paper-2
If I Had Learned Earlier. Paper. 22 x 35 x 2.5 in.

paper-3
In Close Range. Paper. 24 x 35 x 2.5 in.

paper-4
It Came With Me Everywhere. Paper. 19 x 38 x 4 in.

paper-5
It’s Worth it This Time. Paper hair curler, coils. 21 x 32 x 2 in.

paper-6
It’s Worth it This Time. Detail.

paper-7
I Was Thinking of Something Else. Paper lawn chair, leaves. 17 x 24 x 3 in.

paper-8I Was Thinking of Something Else. Detail.

 
#funandrandom 
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Influential Interfaces Lead to Advances in Organic Spintronics

Spintronics is an emerging field of electronics in which devices work by manipulating the quantum mechanical spin1 of electrons, in addition

The post Influential Interfaces Lead to Advances in Organic Spintronics has been published on Technology Org.

 
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What is a Terrestrial Planet?

In studying our Solar System over the course of many centuries, astronomers learned a great deal about the

The post What is a Terrestrial Planet? has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Floating through the abyss

On March 18, 1965, Russian cosmonaut Alexei Leonov stepped out of the Voskhod 2 spacecraft and into the unknown.


Leonov floats through space at the end of a lifeline during the first spacewalk. (AP Photo)



The Soviets had practiced the entire operation countless times on Earth. But actually opening the hatch hundreds of miles above our planet's surface must have been unimaginably nerve-wracking for Leonov. The astronaut told TIME photographer Marco Grob that one facet of the first spacewalk still stands out sharply in his memory.

"I remember the sound, this remarkable silence," he said. "You can hear your heart beat and you can hear yourself breathe. Nothing else can accurately represent what it sounds like when a human being is in the middle of this abyss."

Below, stunning images of other astronauts who, in the five decades since Leonov opened the Voskhod hatch, have ventured into that same silent chasm in the name of science.


June 3, 1965: Edward H. White completes the first U.S. spacewalk during the Gemini 4 mission. | (NASA/Roger Ressmeyer/CORBIS)



August 6, 1973: Jack Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, deploys the twin-pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop. | (NASA)



February 9, 1984: Bruce McCandless fires the nitrogen-gas jets from his Manned Maneuvering Unit to venture some 300 feet from the Challenger shuttle without a tether. | (AP Photo/NASA)



September 3, 2009: John "Danny" Olivas smiles for the camera while he works on construction and maintenance of the International Space Station. | (NASA/Reuters/Corbis)



April 6, 1984: Two astronauts work on a satellite in the cargo bay of the Challenger space shuttle. | (NASA/Roger Ressmeyer/CORBIS)



October 22, 1993: Kathryn Thornton hovers over equipment on the Hubble Space Telescope, guided by the Remote Manipulator System. | (CORBIS)



December 2006: Astronauts Robert L. Curbeam and Christer Fugelsang work to attach a new truss segment to the ISS and upgrade the power grid. | (STS-116 Shuttle Crew/NASA.gov)



November 2007: Scott Parazynski assesses his repair work during a 7-hour, 19-minute spacewalk. | (NASA)



November 15, 2010: Oleg Skripochka helps install a multipurpose workstation on the ISS. | (NASA)



November 9, 2013: Oleg Kotov smiles while working on the ISS. | (NASA)

 
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 » see original post http://theweek.com/captured/545360/floating-through-abyss

Electric vehicle batteries are getting cheaper much faster than we expected

Earlier this year, Telsa Motors made headlines when it announced that the company would start selling Tesla-branded stationary storage batteries. The move was expected, but a bit odd—battery storage for homes has been around for years, but it has never really been cost-effective enough in most households to merit the kind of treatment that Tesla gave it. While Tesla successfully nurtured a luxury electric vehicle market, it still seemed out of place to see a luxury brand going out of its way to put car batteries on homes.

Ars argued that the real news behind Tesla's stationary storage announcement was not that of the consumer-focused Powerwall, but that of the power pack, Tesla's stationary battery system for industrial use cases.

The truly surprising part of Tesla's Powerwall announcement, however, was its price point. In 2014, the average cost of installing a stationary Li-ion battery in a California home was $23,429, according to The Wall Street Journal. In May, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said that these batteries would start at $3,500, plus a $500 installation cost.

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NASA Experts Discuss Science Fiction, Science Fact, Journey to Mars at ComicCon

For the second year in a row, NASA is participating in ComicCon International in San Diego. NASA experts

The post NASA Experts Discuss Science Fiction, Science Fact, Journey to Mars at ComicCon has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Hello, Gorgeous! “Pulse” Technology May Replenish Skin’s Collagen

Americans spend over \$10 billion a year on products and surgery in their quest to find a “fountain

The post Hello, Gorgeous! “Pulse” Technology May Replenish Skin’s Collagen has been published on Technology Org.

 
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