Monday, 20 July 2015

The “Skeleton Flower” Turns From White to Translucent When Exposed to Water

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via yamaiki

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via yamaiki

via Minkara

via Minkara

via Minkara

via Minkara

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via yamaiki

via akimaru

via akimaru

via ike photo

via ike photo

The Diphelleia grayi or “Skeleton Flower” is finally a reason to look forward to rainy days. This rare flower transforms into a translucent beauty [its skeletal form] when exposed to water, its white petals becoming completely clear while wet, then transforming back to their original color once dry.

Found in only three locations in the world, the flower grows in the colder regions of China and Japan, and within the United States’ Appalachian Mountains. In addition to its transformation capabilities, the flower is also recognized by its large, umbrella-like leaves and bright green and yellow centers. To watch the transformation of the Diphelleia grayi from white to translucent, watch the video above. (via Bored Panda)

 
#funandrandom 
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Rosetta blog: CometWatch 25 June

Today’s CometWatch entry presents an image taken on 25 June from a distance of 168 km from the

The post Rosetta blog: CometWatch 25 June has been published on Technology Org.

 
#astronomy 
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Nature knows best. We should always take steps that help us by harmonizing with nature.

Nature knows best. We should always take steps that help us by harmonizing with nature.

Ars Technica originally shared:

Shrimp—not only generally delicious, but a specific species could help battle a deadly disease

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Manual augmented reality...

Manual augmented reality...

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Aww...


Aww...

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Suffrage and women's rights. Who do you know that's passionate enough about this hot topic that...

Suffrage and women's rights. Who do you know that's passionate enough about this hot topic that they want bags declaring their support?
Please share with them :)

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You're welcome, Deb :) Took me a while to reply - sorry!

You're welcome, Deb :) Took me a while to reply - sorry!

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Vote on a message to send to space about what earthlings think of the world

We're not sure if there's anyone out there to receive them, but we earthlings have been sending messages into space for 40 years now. We've sent radio broadcasts, plaques engraved with pictures, and even a gold-plated record album. So far, we haven't gotten any return messages, but METI (Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) enthusiasts are still coming up with new ways to tackle the two crucial questions raised by this kind of endeavor: How should we send the message? And what should it say?

The first question is technical, concerning the durability of materials, the means of transmission, and the distances to travel. The second is more complicated and far more interesting. A message like this is also a declaration: "This is what we find important. This is who we are."

The Earth Tapestry project aims to create a message that represents a shared, global answer to these questions through an online vote. Pairs of landmarks like Red Square, Machu Picchu, the Lascaux Caves, and others around the world (180 total) are presented along with the questions on eight different parameters: Which is more awe-inspiring? Information-rich? Famous? Noble? Ingenious? Delightful? Durable? Irreplaceable?

The plan is to create a laser engraved disc of a map of the earth along with a legend giving coordinates of these places and what we think about them. It will be sent to the moon on an Astrobotic Technology lander next year.

The director of Earth Tapestry, William Alba of Carnegie Mellon University, says the moon, being "the border between the terrestrial and celestial, between us and the rest of the universe" is a good place to put this information capsule. Not only might extra-terrestrial beings discover it, but humans from the future might as well.

There is also an art installation planned. Alba says they "will continue to take votes over the next year and a half. We plan to fill a space with images of the locations so people can get a sense of what's important to them and people around the world." Earth Tapestry images will be displayed for durations that accord with their rankings in the voting.

There are many other ways to give a sense of what humans find important, of course, but for Alba, landmarks of the world is a good arena for a trial run, to make "a kind of playground or sandbox to think about what do we think is important about ourselves as human beings and how do we decide that together. Place draws people's attention to the globe as a whole. They'll think about where they are and where other people are."

You can cast your vote at earthtapestry.org.

 
#science 
 » see original post http://theweek.com/articles/549449/vote-message-send-space-about-what-earthlings-think-world

Kenyan Artist Digs Through Electronic Refuse and Found Metal to Create Dazzling Sculptural Eyewear

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Digging through electronic refuse and found metal in Kenya’s capital of Nairobi, Cyrus Kabiru refashions found materials into different wearable forms. Often these take the form of flamboyantly composed glasses, large eyewear that can often mask the entire face.

Kabiru explains that his glasses obsession started at a young age, and blossomed as his father crushed his dreams of owning his own pair. “When I was young, I used to admire real glasses but my dad was a bit harsh and he never wanted me to have real glasses. That’s the reason I started making the glasses.”

His creations situate themselves in several different areas of art, shuffling between performance, sculpture, and fashion—embodying the playfulness of the youth generation in Nairobi. “When you walk in town and you see someone with my glasses, the glasses will [get] all your attention,” said Kabiru. “If you have any stress it is like a therapy.”

In addition to his found object sculptures and glasses, Kabiru is a self-taught painter, his subject matter being humorous portrayal of contemporary Kenyan life. His most recent series uses thousands of bottle caps sewn together to depict African nature. “I really love trash. I try to give trash a second chance. I change it to be something else, which is like it will stay for more than 100 years now.” (via prosthetic knowledge)

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#funandrandom 
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Deep space images shed light on dark matter

New images of deep space are helping to shed light on dark matter, the invisible material that accounts

The post Deep space images shed light on dark matter has been published on Technology Org.

 
#astronomy 
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