Saturday, 29 August 2015

Sticker shock: simple bus ads could drastically improve road safety in Kenya

Road safety is a serious public health issue worldwide: 1.3 million people are killed in road transportation accidents every year, most of which occur in the developing world. In a study published in PNAS, researchers present the results of a randomized intervention to test whether a simple sticker could be enough to change people’s behavior behind the wheel. This extremely simple and cost-effective approach reduced insurance claims by 25 to 33 percent.

The road safety experiment was conducted in Kenya between 2011 and 2013. Stickers with evocative messages were posted inside the country’s 14-seater minibuses, suggesting that passengers speak up if their driver was being unsafe. Vehicles (and their drivers) were recruited into the study at the point of insurance purchase then randomized into one of the treatment groups or one of the control groups.

The experiment included several different treatment groups, including a placebo set that saw a neutral sticker saying "Travel Well." The other three groups all saw stickers intended to catch eyes:  the first used evocative messages with text about dangerous driving and no images; the second saw evocative messages with text about dangerous driving and images of people speaking up; and the third viewed evocative messages about dangerous driving with images of post-accident riders. Within each of these groups, there were subgroups in which the message encouraged either individual action or collective action—the latter involved a message roughly equivalent to “together we can.”

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From Fluids to Flames, Research on the Space Station is Helping Advance Technology

The International Space Station enables technological advances that benefit the planet and people who live on it. The

The post From Fluids to Flames, Research on the Space Station is Helping Advance Technology has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Glass Cross Sections of Fruit and Other Foods by Elliot Walker

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London-based artist Elliot Walker uses molten glass to create a stunning variety sculptures including these arrangements of eating utensils, vessels, and cross sections of food. The stark outer surfaces of the surrounding objects contrasts with the vibrant interiors of the edible pieces, not unlike the effect of a cut geode. Walker currently has work at the Peter Layton Glass Blowing Studio as part of their current exhibition titled Essence that runs through the end of the week. You can see more photos of his work on Facebook.

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Space Image: Feathery filaments in Mon R2

Fierce flashes of light ripple through delicate tendrils of gas in this new image, from ESA’s Herschel space

The post Space Image: Feathery filaments in Mon R2 has been published on Technology Org.

 
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Watch Molten Glass 3D-Printed From a Kiln at 1900 Degrees

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In collaboration with the MIT Glass Lab, the Mediated Matter group at the MIT Media Lab has produced a way to 3D print glass, creating intricate patterns from molten glass inside a kiln-like printer and giving a completely modern twist to the 4,500 year-old material. The video produced to exhibit the ways in which the technology works displays the process without words, instead focusing on the mesmerizing way the hot glass stacks upon itself in the machine and ultimately cools into the final vase-like forms.

Glass 3D printing (or G3DP) is based on a dual-heated chamber concept, with the top chamber heating the glass and lower chamber slowly cooling it to prevent internal stresses. The top chamber operates at approximately 1900°F, and funnels the molten material through an alumina-zircon-silica nozzle into its programmable shapes.

The researchers explain the concept of the project as one that “synthesizes modern technologies, with age-old established glass tools and technologies producing novel glass structures with numerous potential applications.” One application of which is beautifully designed vessels created without human error, forms that are mathematically perfect in appearance and design.

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Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

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Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

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3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

 
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Cameras Delivered for NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission as Launch Prep Continues

The first U.S. mission to return samples of an asteroid to Earth is another step closer to its

The post Cameras Delivered for NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission as Launch Prep Continues has been published on Technology Org.

 
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“Quantum dot” technology may help light the future

Advances at Oregon State University in manufacturing technology for “quantum dots” may soon lead to a new generation

The post “Quantum dot” technology may help light the future has been published on Technology Org.

 
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