Thursday, 1 October 2015

The particle accelerator that can draw data out of specks of comet dust

A fair amount of Earth science research is based on incredibly subtle measurements of isotopes obtained from minerals or the remains of long-dead organisms. Surprising histories and insights can be recorded in minute shifts of these isotopes. But we never talk about how those measurements are made, since this particular sorcery is commonplace in modern science.

For example, a recent story about how quickly Yellowstone has coughed up eruptions in the past stated, "The researchers made spot measurements—tiny spots less than half a micron apart—of barium, strontium, and magnesium crossing the boundary of the [feldspar] crystal rims." Hidden behind that sentence is some remarkable technology—and many hours spent using it. (That's what happens when you reduce several years of 21st century research to 800 words.)

To make partial amends for this slight, Ars visited a lab in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's geoscience department to check out one of the instruments behind this magic. That lab is managed by John Valley and Noriko Kita and is kept running through the hard work of several others. Like other geologists, Valley used to interrogate tiny crystals of the mineral zircon the only way he could—by tossing a pile of them into an instrument and making bulk measurements of their chemistry. If those crystals were uniform, with no difference between or within them, that would be great. But there was no way to know whether this was true.

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Nautica Women's Swimwear Spring 2016


We are heading into the tail end of summer (boo). Nautica Women's Swimwear gave us a "City Meets Sea" themed evening at New York's Dream Hotel. Models wearing the label's bikinis and swimsuits posed on top of pedestals and giant inflatable swans in the hotel's tiny basin of a pool. The so-called beach club at the hotel was probably the best representation of an urban oasis NYC has to offer.

The swimwear was simple and sporty. The classic Nautica colors of navy, white and black were used. There was one print that was an abstract beach pattern. The City Meets Sea theme explains why the swimwear cuts look like sportswear. The one-shouldered suit could be worn under a skirt and jacket. Bikini separates could be layering pieces. While the V-necked one-piece suits had plunging necklines and high-cut legs, the swimwear looked like it was actually meant for swimming.

It is interesting to note that their male counterparts from New York Fashion Week Men's had a more flamboyant collection. Their swim shorts had a larger variety of graphics, prints and finishing details. Nautica's strength has always been menswear while their women's lines have been launched and re-launched multiple times.

Nautica Women's Swimwear gave my fellow writers and me a nice little escape from the concrete. If you need a momentary escape to the beach just for an hour, you know where to go.
 
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Study points way toward ‘filming’ molecule-light interactions

A new study from UNL physicists could inform the future production of 3-D movies starring light-driven molecular reactions

The post Study points way toward 'filming' molecule-light interactions has been published on Technology Org.

 
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The Art Institutes Fall 2015


 Twelve student and alumni designers from The Art Institutes displayed their work on the NYFW runways. I find that each design school has a distinct look. For The Art Institutes, the silhouettes were easier, draped, more fabric focused than silhouette-focused than schools like FIT or Parsons.

Colors were muted. There were different shades of grey, neutral black and white, brown, mustard. Even their pop colors of red or orange were dark and muddied. The looks on the catwalk were shown to highlight the properties of the materials. Whether it was the sheen of laminated check fabric or the drape of a silk or the hefty texture of over-sized crochet sweaters.

Mentors for this collection of designers included Douglas Hannant, Thuy Diep, Calvin Klein Intimates designer David Siedlarczyk and Daniela Anastasio Bardazzi, creative director over Etienne Aigner. The designers themselves included representatives of different Art Institutes locations. Some of the designers included from Grace Ahn of Dallas, Daniela Ramirez of San Francisco, Parker Trumble of Miami to Jamaree Eimmanassakul of Vancouver.

The deeper theme of the collection looked to be that every look was more than meets the eye. Fabric was manipulated into shapes that would not naturally be achieved. Intricate sewing that had to be executed with surgical precision due to its sheer properties. 

Congratulations to The Art Institutes Fashion Design class of 2015 and good luck in whatever city you hail from.
 
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Vertical Panoramic Photographs of New York Churches by Richard Silver

Church-of-St-Vincent-Ferrer
Church of St. Vincent Ferrer

Richard Silver (previously) has a unique way of looking at architecture, building composite photographs from several images that seamlessly reveal a structure's interior. His new series captures the insides of New York churches, and are perfectly timed for the Pope's impending arrival on U.S. soil. These images are composed of 6-10 shots, forming a vertical panorama so cohesive that it might give you vertigo.

Although Silver has been to hundreds of churches during his career and many years of travel, it's only recently that he figured out how to capture the expansive inner beauty of their architecture. "Finding the perfect location in the center aisle then shooting vertically from the pew to the back of the church gives the perspective that only architecture of this style can portray," says Silver.

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Church of St. Stephen / Church of St. Paul the Apostle

Silver was born and raised in New York and has visited 75 countries in his life, including 13 last year alone. His previous careers involved computer science, real estate, and a stint on Wall Street, but he embraced photography full-time in 2011. You can see more of his vertical church series on his Flickr page here.

Calvary-Episcopal-Church
Calvary Episcopal Church

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Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava / Church of the Village

Church-of-St.-Francis-Xavier
Church of St. Francis Xavier

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Vincent St. de Paul / Most Holy Redeemer Church

St-Monica's-Church
St. Monica's Church

 
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